Dr. Ron McBride To Retire From College

Dr. Ron McBride is retiring from the College of Education and Human Development following 28 years of service. During his time at the Texas A&M., Dr. McBride made a significant contribution to the Department of Health and Kinesiology. He produced multiple publications, participated in development of the Division of Kinesiology, and remains a key figure in the Sport Pedagogy program.

“It’s been a great ride here at Texas A&M and I’ve enjoyed every minute of it,” said Dr. McBride. “I’ve seen this university come from being one of the two top universities in the state of Texas, to being one of the top universities in the country. It’s been a source of pride for us all and it’s a tribute to the faculty hired over the years.”

Dr. McBride said the growth of the HLKN department mirrored the growth of the university. Due to the widespread interest and shifts within the sport world, the Division of Kinesiology became very specialized and diversified. Such developments helped shape multi-sided programs that benefited students. 

“Our students get a strong science preparation by finding out how movement, anatomy, and physiology relates to physical activity. They also get excellent prep in how to be effective teachers on the pedagogy side,” he said. “Blending those two aspects, students today are getting a far better prep for their teaching careers than a generation ago.” 

Dr. McBride also recalled the changes he saw in the academic output of the university. He said the system-wide shift toward research and external funding helped to shape the new standard for the HLKN Department.

“That’s really the mission of an institution like ours — to generate and disseminate new knowledge,” he said. “In my area in teacher preparation, we are seeing methods in increasing student learning and that’s why research is so exciting. We keep growing step by step and that has an impact on society as a whole.” 

Student involvement proved to be a high point in Dr. McBride’s career. He recalled the consistent motivation he received by academically engaging with the minds of his students. 

“They always keep me on my toes,” he said. “They want to do well and that’s always kept me up and enthusiastic. That’s the greatest reward.”

Written by:

Justin Ikpo (cehdcomm@tamu.edu)

Post date: May 31, 2016